Category: Social Media

Keeping Up With Culture: How to Stay Relevant

June 16, 2017 — Krisana Jaritsat

Our strategy intern, Sarah Mitty recounts her most memorable sessions at the Northside Festival.

Our culture is constantly evolving. Each day is a whirlwind of new consumer behavior trends, technological achievements and political updates. Keeping up with our world is challenging enough, how are brands supposed to ensure their output is culturally relevant? Last week, I attended the Northside Festival where some of the brightest minds in innovation discussed how to accomplish this feat.

Think Tech The amount of exciting new technology discussed at the conference was mind blowing. From artificial intelligence to augmented reality platforms, a hyper-technologized future seems very close to the horizon.

Alex Chung, the CEO of GIPHY, was confident that augmented reality would be standard in four years. This means it will likely be integrated into all parts of life from music (a hologram Justin Bieber performing a concert in your bedroom) to sports (player statistics popping up in front of your eyes) and beyond. This leaves the question: What is the cultural value that AR technology will provide? The panelists, Alex Chung (GIPHY), Sofia Dominguez (Svrf), Raj Advani (Viro), Bill Marino (Uru), and Matt Hartman (Betaworks) debated the ideals of communication versus entertainment. […]

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3 Keys to Creating Content that Gets Noticed

June 15, 2017 — Krisana Jaritsat

At the Northside Festival, Shutterstock, the stock photography company, sponsored master classes by experts in the technology, design and production industries addressing different facets of content. The sessions we attended were taught by Lauren Reddy, Director of Audience & Development of T Studio (of The New York Times), Theo Ernstsson, CEO of Alpha, and Jason Schickle and Jesekeena Hahn of Shutterstock. The main takeaway from the sessions was the importance of creating content that would truly add value to a user’s lives. While each speaker represented different vantage points, courtesy of the industry they were speaking on behalf of, it was unanimously agreed upon that content is the future of marketing.

1. Be useful Nowadays, as a consumer, we have our pick of options. Any product or service, no matter its obscurity or location, is within arm’s reach due to the advances in technology. As technology continues to impact and shape a consumer perception and loyalties, how is a brand supposed to stand out in its value proposition? By being consistently useful. Theo Ernstsson’s session, ‘How to Cut Through Bullshit to Create Great Products,’ proposes that experimentation and execution was the path to usefulness. He believes that by rapid iteration […]

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The Start of Something Big

May 16, 2016 — Lisbet Gutierrez

I spent this weekend at The Period Shop — the world’s very first pop up store dedicated to periods, created by our favorite period brand U by Kotex. To say that I’m proud to work with the CBX U by Kotex project would be an understatement. The pop-up shop brings to life the brand mission in a tangible way, and the shelves were lined with our anti-stereotype package designs. See more about how these cool, colorful designs came to be here.

The Period Shop was inspired by a Tumblr post from a young woman, Sarah M., who partnered with U by Kotex to make her vision a reality on 5th Avenue in NYC. Part celebration, part proclamation, The Period Shop is proof that, together, we can change how we think about, talk about, and shop for periods. All proceeds benefit Susan’s Place, a NYC-based transitional residence for homeless women.

And here are photos from my #PeriodProjects experience:

 

 

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America: The Land Of The Beer

May 10, 2016 — Rachel Bernard

“As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect.” —The Metamorphosis, Franz Kafka

It’s morning in America, folks. And as America awoke this morning, it found itself transformed into the king of beers. Today, Budweiser announced that starting May 23rd they will henceforth be referred to as America. With that, our nation has manifested its destiny.

E pluribus unum. Where there were once two brands. There is now one. If you think about it, the union between brand America and brand Budweiser could not be more perfect. Both are iconic. Both are red, white and blue. Both have moved their manufacturing bases overseas. And both can get you bombed. #Twinning.

This bud really is for you, America.

Photo courtesy of Entrepreneur.

 

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Reimagining the Brand Architecture at the Westminster Dog Show

February 23, 2016 — Maryann Stump

Every year the Westminster Dog Show provides an opportunity to see the vast portfolio of dogs the canine species has to offer. From a brand perspective there’s a problem though – the brand portfolio architecture is stuck in the 1880s.

Sporting Photo courtesy of USA Today

Working Photo courtesy of PBS

Hound Photo courtesy of Fox 5 San Diego

Herding Photo courtesy of US News

Toy Photo courtesy of Forbes

What’s wrong with this list? It’s not nice to call your best friend a toy, for one thing. For another, herding is work; ask any parent. Most importantly, this is not how people shop for a dog. Brand architecture should reflect the decisions consumers make when deciding what to buy. So let’s look at this portfolio from the perspective of actual (or aspiring) dog owners and the questions in their minds as they shop.

Will this dog fit in my living space?

Apartment dogs Photo courtesy of Pinterest

Subset – New York City apartment dogs (aka, have enough head room to clear an Ikea coffee table) 

Photo courtesy of Izismile

Townhouse dog Photo courtesy of Rssing

Suburban dogs Photo courtesy of Areawoods

[…]

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What Does Your Business Stand For?

February 22, 2016 — Kent Lam

Last week in our series of 2016 predictions, we took a look at coming trends in technology naming. This week, we’re turning our attention to B2B brands—and how they’re using verbal strategies to tell more human stories about who they are and what they do.

Back in the day—when shoulder pads abounded and greed was good—the default personality for B2B brands was “big and powerful.” They had functional, impersonal, proudly corporate names like IBM, SAP, Qualcomm. The names—inscrutable acronyms and jargon to the Average Joe—were empty vessels that didn’t mean anything. They did their job, insinuating oversize presence and boundless reach. But they didn’t say anything about what the brands stood for.

These days, every brand—whether B2B or B2C—needs to have meaning, a reason to exist. Big and powerful, intimidating and impersonal—these are not the kinds of brands that businesses want to work with anymore, that consumers want to buy. In a landscape of more personal, more human, more local and transparent and approachable brands, B2B brands have needed to adopt new strategies. Using the same tools as B2C brands, B2Bs are starting to communicate what they stand for. Here are a few examples of brands that are already doing […]

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Shame, Shame, we don’t know your name…

June 19, 2015 — Rachel Bernard

Remember when Domino’s dropped “Pizza” from its name back in 2012? You wouldn’t know it by all the signs with the old logo saying “Domino’s Pizza” still hanging out at its franchisee locations. Enter Domino’s new social media campaign encouraging the public to shame locations yet to embrace the new logo, arming them with the hashtag #logoinformants and the promise of free pizza for a year.

Before we start the play-by-play on Domino’s naming and messaging strategy—can we just take a minute to savor the delicious irony of this? Domino’s wants to be known for more than pizza so much that they are willing to entice customers to narc on franchisees with…wait for it…pizza—the very product they are trying to distance themselves from. Hilarious.

Anyway, let’s carry on with brand analysis of this move.

The good: name-dropping We are big fans of this type of name-dropping. In 2007, Apple dropped “Computers” from its name paving the way for greater innovation in everything from phones to tablets, even watches. In 2012, Starbucks decaffeinated its name by removing “Coffee” from its logo, a move that perhaps overshadowed the Domino’s name-drop that year. All of these brands did one very simple thing when […]

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Captivating Characters

April 27, 2015 — Audra Nebolini

My love affair with typography started like it does for most creatives with doodles. What young girl didn’t write her name all over her notebooks in school? Sounds like a cliché, I know, but movement of thick to thins, creating the drama of revealing shapes and forms just makes my heart beat faster. I must have known somewhere in my subconscious that these illustrative habits would transform into my future in use of visual communication.

As a result, I can’t hide my excitement for the recent rise of hand lettering in graphic design. Breaking out of the mechanical digital age in design has become a prevailing trend and is a new outlet for self expression. Even more than social media, blogs, and autobiographies self expression is evolving from verbal to visual through typography.

This new trend is signaling the need for originality in the DIY culture we are living in. Calligraphy and hand lettering styles have boomed in the industry in forms of personalization to emulate the handmade look. In a recent article, Martina Flor, a well known typographer, describes the two perfectly: “Calligraphy embraces randomness and surprise, while lettering decides exactly the shape that a certain gesture or letter should have.” You could compare a letterform or type style to any human trait, and that’s what makes them so […]

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The Super Bawl: Nationwide Insurance’s Disruptive Campaign

February 9, 2015 — Brian Burr

For a Super Bowl decided by what some have called the worst play call in NFL history, it’s no surprise that tears were shed. But in a world where hundreds of people actually bet on the potential length of Katy Perry’s pants, few would have been able to predict the real cause of many viewers’ emotional afflictions. In what felt like a flood of serious advertisements, no brand pushed the envelope more than Nationwide Insurance. The 45-second spot “Make Safe Happen” aired halfway through the second quarter and immediately became what I like to call the “Marley & Me” of Super Bowl commercials, based purely on its heartbreak potential. The ad, which was intended to raise awareness of accidental child deaths, features a young boy listing the many accomplishments he will never achieve. Inspired by childlike wonder and accompanied by impressive special effects, the ad then takes a serious turn when the child actor coolly admits, “I couldn’t grow up, because I died from an accident.” An overflowing bathtub, poisonous cleaning supplies and overturned television set fill the frame as a narrator urges viewers to help “make safe happen.”

The reaction went over just about as well as you would […]

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A Video is Worth a Thousand Pictures

January 29, 2015 — Ted Bachman

Picture this—you’re hunched over your friend’s computer, looking over his shoulder as you see the 25th picture of the Eiffel Tower from his trip to France. Your cheeks are hurting from holding a smile, but you’re somehow able to keep saying “oh nice!” over again. Meanwhile, you haven’t even made it to the Louvre in your pictorial tour yet—better get comfy! I love still photography, but everywhere you look, the world is moving to video. Instagram, Facebook and Twitter are all using video. And YouTube uploads over 100 hours of video every minute. That’s a lot of cats! Video is increasingly used online to showcase consumer products, even real estate. (At CBX, we’re beginning to transition to video to highlight case studies of our work.) In fact, three-quarters of web traffic is predicted to be video related by 2017. Not to mention, anyone with a smartphone has a video screen in his or her pocket and the ability to shoot video at any moment. While mobile video isn’t particularly new, what’s remarkable is the access to and use of smartphones around the globe. In the US alone, two-thirds of the population uses a smartphone, including over 80% of young adults. […]

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