Category: Research and Insights

Introducing #StraightTalk

September 14, 2017 — Krisana Jaritsat

At CBX, we create brand experiences designed for cultural and commercial impact. What does this mean in our ever-changing landscape of evolving business, technologies and consumer interests? On a daily basis, we’ll continue to investigate and explore this notion through the brands and leaders we both work with and are inspired by. In a more straightforward and IRL experience, we decided to dig further into this via our first event series, #StraightTalk.

Plain and simple, we see #StraightTalk as an opportunity to connect with disruptors and provocateurs in their industries to converse on all topics relating to business, culture and commerce. #StraightTalk is our way of facilitating an exchange of ideas from people spanning the spectrum of industry. We will be experimenting with different formats, video content and unexpected guests along the way. We don’t necessarily know where the road is headed but we promise, we’ll keep the talk straight and everything else crooked as hell.

# 1: The Catch 22 of Big

In a recent study from CB Insights, global food and beverage funding since 2012 has added up to $5.9 billion across 1300 deals. Take a look around your grocery store and you’ll see hundreds of new […]

Continue Reading

What Does Your Business Stand For?

February 22, 2016 — Kent Lam

Last week in our series of 2016 predictions, we took a look at coming trends in technology naming. This week, we’re turning our attention to B2B brands—and how they’re using verbal strategies to tell more human stories about who they are and what they do.

Back in the day—when shoulder pads abounded and greed was good—the default personality for B2B brands was “big and powerful.” They had functional, impersonal, proudly corporate names like IBM, SAP, Qualcomm. The names—inscrutable acronyms and jargon to the Average Joe—were empty vessels that didn’t mean anything. They did their job, insinuating oversize presence and boundless reach. But they didn’t say anything about what the brands stood for.

These days, every brand—whether B2B or B2C—needs to have meaning, a reason to exist. Big and powerful, intimidating and impersonal—these are not the kinds of brands that businesses want to work with anymore, that consumers want to buy. In a landscape of more personal, more human, more local and transparent and approachable brands, B2B brands have needed to adopt new strategies. Using the same tools as B2C brands, B2Bs are starting to communicate what they stand for. Here are a few examples of brands that are already doing […]

Continue Reading