Category: Food

Food for thought on the new FDA label

November 1, 2016 — admin

Big news, food manufacturers, the FDA is making changes to the nutrition facts label. All food manufacturers will be expected to comply with these changes by July 26, 2018.

What does this specifically mean for you? It means you’ll be:

– highlighting calories and servings, so consumers can make more informed food choices – indicating “added sugars” instead of just “sugars” – disclosing “per serving” and “per package” calorie and nutritional information (because who ever really follows the recommended “per serving” information anyway)

(as well as several other changes, but these three are the big ones)

A few suggestions for you to consider when making these changes:

1. Stay calm and be true to your brand

Remember it’s all about authenticity these days. Don’t try to reinvent your brand as something it’s not. Consumers buy your brand and love it for a reason. Continue to do what you do best – stay true to you.

2. Educate your consumers

Tell your consumers all the good stuff happening in your product. While many of the changes seem like doom and gloom (hello 45g of sugar in a 100% juice brand). There are a lot of great things to tell consumers about […]

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America: The Land Of The Beer

May 10, 2016 — Rachel Bernard

“As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect.” —The Metamorphosis, Franz Kafka

It’s morning in America, folks. And as America awoke this morning, it found itself transformed into the king of beers. Today, Budweiser announced that starting May 23rd they will henceforth be referred to as America. With that, our nation has manifested its destiny.

E pluribus unum. Where there were once two brands. There is now one. If you think about it, the union between brand America and brand Budweiser could not be more perfect. Both are iconic. Both are red, white and blue. Both have moved their manufacturing bases overseas. And both can get you bombed. #Twinning.

This bud really is for you, America.

Photo courtesy of Entrepreneur.

 

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Date At Your Own Risk: Licensing in Branding

August 26, 2015 — Lucila Tessi

Becoming a “licensee” allows brands the opportunity to extend into a new category or industry, modernize, stay relevant and build upon their brand value. When choosing the right licensing opportunity and when implemented effectively, it can have tremendous benefits. As of late, we’ve seen this with Minion-mania. It’s been said that Universal will make more off of licensed products than the Minions movie that just came out in July. Sounds tempting, right? But before jumping in, let’s take a step back and evaluate licensing.

The way I see it, licensing is a very personal tool used by brands. I often think of it as a relationship. Two people joining as one and representing what each other stands for. You look to benefit from each other, you meet each other’s friends and as a couple you work together to make each other happy. But unlike a relationship, you have the opportunity to plan for success prior to creating the partnership.

Here are five guidelines for brands to keep in mind when thinking of entering a (licensed) relationship:

What are you looking to get out of this?

Licensing should be used as a strategic business tool. Brands that want to license someone else’s intellectual […]

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Evolving Brand Equity: The Resurrection of the Colonel

July 14, 2015 — Christina Papale

Have you seen him? He’s on-air and online, wandering through highway underpasses and baseball fields with a big bucket of chicken.

Why, hello. It’s me. The Colonel.

Colonel Harland Sanders, the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC), sold the company in 1964 but appeared in countless ads for the brand through the 60s and 70s – a big old-fashioned man with Southern fried charm. But Colonel Sanders was more than a real-life spokesperson for the brand – he became a larger-than-life brand equity, a Big Daddy Tennessee Williams style matriarch presented as master of his chicken universe. Even with cane in hand, the Colonel had a formidable power. You believed he was a trusted protector of real meals in the age of fast food, and a true chicken benefactor. In the days before Chick-fil-A and Church’s, when Americans wanted fried chicken, they went to the Colonel. They had a relationship with him.

Although the Colonel passed in 1980, the power of his image continued as the central force in the brand’s identity – his smiling mug was part of the logo, on packaging, and in-store. But the meaning of the Colonel shifted with the passing of a real human […]

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Dining for Design’s Sake

July 1, 2015 — Natalie Shear

Choosing a place to eat in the ever-evolving and expanding food scene of New York City can be a daunting task. There are thousands of choices, many of which are convenient, affordable, and pretty tasty. But for myself and many of my peers, choosing a place to eat is about much more than the taste and price tag – it’s actually about being a part of a thoughtful dining experience. In addition to good food and good service, that experience is a result of good branding.

Creating a memorable dining experience (or any type of physical experience for that matter) is done by making connections; connections between the identity of the brand and the physical space, connections from that brand to the customer. From a restaurant’s mission statement to its décor, right down to the logo and the menu, our expectations have changed, and we want that connection in our day-to-day dining experiences.

There is a scale of breadth and depth at which restaurateurs are using branding to create a unique experience that’ll make them top-of-mind. On the shallow end of the spectrum, the experience may be primarily aesthetic – a restaurant is memorable because of its use of integrated […]

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Shame, Shame, we don’t know your name…

June 19, 2015 — Rachel Bernard

Remember when Domino’s dropped “Pizza” from its name back in 2012? You wouldn’t know it by all the signs with the old logo saying “Domino’s Pizza” still hanging out at its franchisee locations. Enter Domino’s new social media campaign encouraging the public to shame locations yet to embrace the new logo, arming them with the hashtag #logoinformants and the promise of free pizza for a year.

Before we start the play-by-play on Domino’s naming and messaging strategy—can we just take a minute to savor the delicious irony of this? Domino’s wants to be known for more than pizza so much that they are willing to entice customers to narc on franchisees with…wait for it…pizza—the very product they are trying to distance themselves from. Hilarious.

Anyway, let’s carry on with brand analysis of this move.

The good: name-dropping We are big fans of this type of name-dropping. In 2007, Apple dropped “Computers” from its name paving the way for greater innovation in everything from phones to tablets, even watches. In 2012, Starbucks decaffeinated its name by removing “Coffee” from its logo, a move that perhaps overshadowed the Domino’s name-drop that year. All of these brands did one very simple thing when […]

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Serving up a slice of delicious

February 19, 2015 — Jane Sayer

I honestly don’t know how this happened but somewhere along my career path I became the food girl. Literally, from soup to nuts, I’ve worked on it. And besides being to blame for the many fluxes in my weight management (I challenge YOU to search for dumpling imagery and NOT eat them everyday for a week) I have enjoyed every minute of it.

The many restrictions put on food packaging that some might find challenging, I find exhilarating. Ad campaigns have free range to get creative––take, for example, the wonderful Oreo commercials that aired over the last year or so. And then compare that to the Oreo Packaging––it’s not BAD exactly––it’s just very literal. Because ambiguity is the enemy of food packaging and we don’t want any surprises when we open that box, unless, you know, they are really GOOD surprises. But still it’s the possibilities that keep me intrigued. Some of my more brilliant ideas could see the light of day one day right (pig wearing a bow tie as a pork sausage mascot anyone?)?

Some brands have successfully broken the paradigm, such as Campbell’s Go soup and the now defunct Kashi Good Friends cereal that feature people on […]

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What a Difference a Word Makes

May 5, 2014 — Cindy Lord

I had a craving the other day for a big, slutty cheeseburger. So like any other red-blooded American, I drove to the nearest McDonald’s. And that’s when it happened:

“Welcome back,” she said.

Not “welcome” or “good afternoon” or a friendly “hi there!” but —“welcome back.” I placed my order and drove up to the drive-through window and then it happened again:

“Welcome back.”

By this point I am starting to feel pretty special—Sally Field-like on Oscar night (“They like me. They really like me!”)—appreciated, like they really valued my business, and important. They remembered me—how did they know I’d been here before? Yes, I know they were saying this to EVERYBODY. And the odds are way on their side that I have been to McDonald’s before, but it still made me feel good. There was gratitude packed into that phrase.

“Welcome back” had changed my entire perspective on the experience. It wasn’t a new menu item they’d spent years developing or an innovative sales contraption that more accurately (and speedily) took my order. And no pioneering form of payment (Bitcoin, anyone?) to speak of. It was that simple, two-word greeting. I caught myself chitchatting with the cashier because hey, […]

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Innovation hurts, donut?

June 14, 2013 — Rachel Bernard

Well, it’s over. The most wonderful faux-holiday of the year, National Donut Day, has come to a delicious close. Now that the powdered sugar has settled, let’s take a moment to loosen our belts and reflect on the biggest triumph of this faux-holiday season, the cronut. Part donut, part croissant, all kinds of crazy delicious, the cronut not only stirred all of NYC into a gluttonous frenzy, it also stirred up quite a bit of controversy. May we present to you the cautionary tale of the cronut, with two valuable lessons brands should know when it comes to defending trademarks and intellectual property? Lesson 1: Being first to market is a blessing and a curse There’s a lot of debate on who was first to market with the cronut. Most media outlets covering Cronut Watch 2013 attribute the innovation to Dominique Ansel, a humble bakery in Greenwich Village. However, Najat Kaanache, chef at Private Social restaurant in Dallas, Texas, has recently taken to twitter to stake her claim as the true inventor of the cronut. While that social media debate rages, there’s the emergence of the knock-off versions calling themselves doissants, crowbars, or even fauxnuts, all trying to prove that […]

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Forget Froyo, Yogurt is Back in Style!

February 26, 2013 — Lucila Tessi

It seems as if the frozen yogurt craze—and talk about a franchise frenzy with all the Red Mangos, Pinkberrys and Yogurtlands across the country—is finally slowing down a bit! As much as Froyo might pick up again this summer, there’s been a bit of a step back to the basics: good ole yogurt.

If you’ve taken a look at the dairy aisle recently, you couldn’t have missed the plethora of new yogurts that have hit the shelf (if you’ve always thought of yogurt as a bit bland or boring, think again). There are drinkable yogurts, fruit- infused yogurts, Greek yogurts, protein yogurts… the list goes on and on. What’s remarkable is that here in New York we’ve even had two yogurt stores open up in the last year: The Yogurt Culture Company, which is a subsidiary of Dannon, and Chobani SoHo, a Mediterranean yogurt bar.

With its “good” bacteria, yogurt is not only healthy but a great base to “dress up” and pair with accent ingredients for a snack, or be used itself as an ingredient to supplement another dish. But with the great number of yogurt options for consumers to choose from, how will each yogurt brand differentiate itself?

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